Heavy Clay Soils Wildflowers

  • Deep rooting wildflowers hold their own in heavy clay soils
  • Perennials provide a year on year range of species variety and colour
  • Makes problematic areas part of the garden again
From £109.20 £91.00
 

How much do I need?

Simply enter the length and width of the area, to calculate how much you need.

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Product Description

Our experts are at it again! We believe wildflowers should be available to everyone, that’s why we created this mix for those who suffer from heavy clay soils and want to introduce wildflowers to these particularly problematic areas. Our Heavy Clay Soils mix is a blend specifically made up of deep rooting wildflowers that will hold their own in heavy clay soils and can also withstand drought conditions when clay soils dry up in hot weather. The accompanying grasses in this mix help to stabilise the structure of the wildflowers by creating a nursery for the perennial flora to thrive in. This mix also provides a food source for bees and pollinators through its selection of RHS Plants for Pollinators wildflowers. 

Mixture Breakdown

0.2% Cats-Ear
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Hypochaeris radicata

Description

Catsear is a dandelion-like perennial. The way to tell the difference between a dandelion and Catsear is that Catsear does not have the distinctive jagged leaves that a dandelion does!

3.0% Oxeye Daisy
When does it bloom?

May – September

What colour is it?

White / Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Leucanthemum vulgare

Description

Imagine the daisy chain these would make! Oxeye Daisy is the largest member of the daisy family and its almost flat surface makes the perfect landing pad for bees and pollinators.

1.4% Black Medick
When does it bloom?

April - July

What colour is it?

Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Annual

Latin Name

Medicago lupulina

Description

Despite its name, Black Medick is actually a yellow wildflower that resembles a clover. Just like a clover, it is exceptionally good at attracting bees and pollinators and due to its 'sprawling' ability, is particularly good at thriving in clay soils!

3% Ribwort Plantain
When does it bloom?

January – December

What colour is it?

White / Brown

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Plantago lanceolata

Description

Ribwort Plantain although not the brightest wildflower, certainly adds a natural diversity to your wildflower meadow. Its tiny white buds provide food for bees and pollinators whilst its seeds are great for Goldfinches.

0.40% Kidney Vetch
When does it bloom?

June – September

What colour is it?

Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Anthyllis vulneraria

Description

Kidney Vetch is a bright yellow budding wildflower that sometimes gets the name Woundwort. Although this isn't the nicest nickname, it was once used for treating ailments, and of course - wounds.

25% Tall Fescue
When does it bloom?

This is a grass seed and typically germinates at temperatures of 8 -10 degrees

What colour is it?

Green / Beige

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Festuca arundinacea

Description

Tall Fescue is a grass that performs in most soil types

25% Crested Dogstail
When does it bloom?

This is a grass seed and typically germinates at temperatures of 8 -10 degrees

What colour is it?

Green / Beige

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Cynosurus cristatus

Description

Crested Dogstail is a grass that performs in most soil types

25% Sheeps Fescue
When does it bloom?

This is a grass seed and typically germinates at temperatures of 8 -10 degrees

What colour is it?

Green / Beige

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Festuca ovina

Description

Sheeps Fescue is a grass that performs in most soil types

1% Salad Burnet
When does it bloom?

May – September

What colour is it?

Pink / Green

Annual or Perennial?

Annual

Latin Name

Sanguisorba minor

Description

A perennial wildflower with toothed leaves and pink flowers, its leaves when crushed smell like cucumber and used to be used in salads!

0.50% Betony
When does it bloom?

June - October

What colour is it?

Purple

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Stachys officinalis

Description

Betony is related to the nettle family and produces bright magenta blooms. It is thought that when you see Betony, it is an indication that ancient woodlands are near.

3.0% Wild Carrot
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

White

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Daucus carota

Description

Part of the carrot family, Wild Carrot smells like carrots but is not the kind of one you would want to eat. Its low nutrient and drought tolerant abilities make it ideal for sandy soils.

1.3% Red Clover
When does it bloom?

May – September

What colour is it?

Purple / Pink

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Trifolium pratense

Description

Red Clover is a popular perennial that despite its name, is actually purple! It's dome-shaped flowers are relatively low-growing which makes it the perfect fodder food for livestock but is also a fan favourite of weary bees who need a feed a little closer to the ground.

0.5% Meadow Sweet
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

White

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Filipendula ulmaria

Description

Meadow Sweet produces frothy clusters of sweet-smelling white flowers. It can be found and favours woodland shaded areas with damp soil

1.50% Yellow Rattle
When does it bloom?

May - September

What colour is it?

Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Annual

Latin Name

Rhinanthus minor

Description

Yellow Rattle can be used in existing meadows where meadow grasses have taken over. It helps to weaken these grasses to allow other wildflowers to flourish, and does this by locking its roots to those of the grasses, and therefore lessens their abundance.

1.50% Corn Poppy
When does it bloom?

June – August

What colour is it?

Red / Black

Annual or Perennial?

Annual

Latin Name

Papaver rhoeas

Description

Corn Poppy is a vibrant and bright addition to any meadow and easily recognisable and identifiable throughout the UK. Of course it has meaning for many, and also adds a colourful pop to any wildflower plot

0.4% Weld
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

Green

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Reseda luteola

Description

Weld sprouts teeny tiny cream buds and has a tendency to appear near foot paths. Although it may not have as much flora as other wildflowers, the spikes on its small flowers are an excellent source of pollen and nectar for butterflies and bees.

Usage Guide

Remove any existing grass, plants or flora from the area where you plan to sow your wildflower seed. Failure to do this will produce poor results
Further remove the top 5-10cm to reduce soil fertility
Allow the area to cultivate for several weeks, and remove any weeds that may pop in the area during this time
Do not be tempted to add top soil, compost or fertiliser to the area - wildflowers prefer low nutrient conditions
After the cultivation period ensure to remove stones or any other debris and rake the area to create a fine, friable and level seedbed
Scatter the seed at a rate of 5g per m2
Rake the seed so that it is in amongst the soil
Water the just-sown wildflower seed well
If sowing in drought conditions, water as required to keep the area moist in the first 6 weeks after sowing

Sowing Rate 5g per m2
When For best results sow in September

Aftercare

I’ve sown my wildflower seed in April / May (spring)

In August / September of the first year you have sown your wildflower seed, cut your wildflower sward to 7cm after flowering – you can do this by putting your mower on a high setting. In most cases remove clippings* (Note: a late spring sowing will result in late flowering). Do not be tempted fertilise or add top soil to this area – wildflowers prefer poor soil conditions, and this is how they should stay. Continue this same process, year after year. *If you have annual wildflowers in your mix and you do not wish them to return the following year, remove the clippings. If you want your wildflowers to return the following year - let them go to seed head, and manually assist their self-seeding by firming the seed heads into the soil. By doing this, your annuals will return the following year.

I’ve sown my wildflower seed in September / October (autumn)

In March / April of the first year of sowing your wildflower seed, make sure there is sufficient material to mow – your wildflowers / grasses should be at a height of 10cm. If your wildflowers are at this height, mow to 7cm no later than mid-April, as this will delay their blooming process. In August / September, after they have bloomed, cut your wildflower meadow again to 7cm, remove all clippings unless you want your annuals to return. If you wish for your annual wildflowers to make a reappearance the following spring, follow the process above by letting the seed heads drop into the soil, and give them a helping hand by firming them into the soil.

The above photo depicts the variety of species you should expect to see in your wildflower display. Please note that certain species within this mix and all our wildflower mixes may become more abundant than others, subject to the conditions that they are sown in. Taking this into consideration, your wildflower meadow will evolve and adapt year on year, changing in appearance as certain species may become more dominant than others.

Product Questions

Product Questions

We sowed 100 g of your Heavy Clay Soil WF Mix last autumn (October) but nothing has come up. The area had turned to moss owning to drought and a Leylandii hedge taking moisture, so we waited for rain before sowing. I was unable to remove the topsoil but had heavily raked it over and it has not had any feeding for decades. The area is still almost entirely bare apart from some tufts of grass which we think have come from seeds already in the soil. We don't get much rain in this area (Epsom) and we are on the London Clay, not chalk. We'd like to try again but would like advice first.
Question by: Roger Tompsett on 24 Jun 2021, 14:33
Hi Roger,

If you would like to email us some pictures of the area, we can take a closer look and advise on best to proceed. You can email them to [email protected]
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 24 Jun 2021, 14:46
I have a section of lawn in my garden that is north facing but next to a high fence and under a tree so doesn’t get a lot of sun.

The soil in the garden is also very claggy clay and very hard.

I didn’t mow it this year and now have tall grass probably about a foot high but no flowers.

I want to try turning it into a wildflower area.

I see you have a mix for shade and a mix for clay but I have both. What do you advise to get this going please?
Question by: Mike on 4 Jul 2022, 07:56
Hi Mike, thank you for your question.


I would recommend our Heavy Clay Soils Wildflowers. This is a mix of wildflower species that have deep rooting properties and penetrate heavy clay soils and are also drought-tolerant, making them ideal for such areas. This is a mix of annuals, perennials and grasses.

If this area is very shady, you could sow a mix of Heavy Clay Soil Wildflowers and Shaded Area Wildflowers. Shaded Area Wildflowers consist of annual and perennial wildflowers and grasses that tolerate damp and shaded areas.

I have also included our guide on how to prep and sow a wildflower meadow:

1. Remove any existing grass, plants or flora from the area where you plan to sow your wildflower seed. Failure to do this will produce poor results
2. Further, remove the top 5-10cm to reduce soil fertility
3. Allow the area to cultivate for several weeks, and remove any weeds that may pop in the area during this time
4. Do not be tempted to add topsoil, compost or fertiliser to the area - wildflowers prefer low nutrient conditions
5. After the cultivation, period ensure to remove stones or any other debris and rake the area to create a fine, friable and level seedbed
6. Scatter the seed at a rate of 5g per m2
7. Rake the seed so that it is in amongst the soil
8. Water the just-sown wildflower seed well

If sowing in drought conditions, water is required to keep the area moist in the first 6 weeks after sowing.
Answer by: Helen McGale on 4 Jul 2022, 09:13
Hi lm looking to sow your heavy clay wild flowers around a new horse area we have made are all flowers horse friendly and will seeds blow off the flowers and germinate the surrounding area.
Question by: Andrew maden on 5 Sept 2022, 19:28
Hi Andrew, thank you for your question. Wildflower seeds can blow in the wind or migrate from wildlife to surrounding areas.

The safeness and suitability of sowing wildflowers in reach of animals is an issue, and whether consumption / ingestion of the flowers is of a huge concern.

Wildflowers such as Buttercups and Foxgloves are poisonous to animals and can be to humans and are present in all our wildflower mixes. Each of these wildflowers has minor to moderate toxicity and can prove fatal if consumed / ingested in any amount. Therefore, we would not recommend sowing any of our wildflower seed mixes, or any others, near your children or pets if you have concerns that they would consume them.

Animals have intelligent instincts and by using their scent can work out what is and what isn’t poisonous, so there is low risk of them wanting to snack on your wildflowers. However, if your livestock has a penchant for wolfing down wildflowers or any other garden flora it is best not to put anything in front of them that could potentially harm them.
Answer by: Helen McGale on 6 Sept 2022, 09:33
Hello

We have a north facing, clay based garden and I am planning to introduce a meadow area bordering the lawn. I plan to use a turf cutter to clear the meadow strips by the lawn. We like the look of the flowering meadow mix but feel the heavy clay mix may be more suitable. Could we get a 1kg bag of each and mix them for a combined effect?
Rgds - Charlie
Question by: Charlie on 16 Sept 2022, 17:59
Hi Charlie,

Thank you for your enquiry.

We would usually recommend our Heavy Clay Soils Wildflowers, for clay conditions such as this, as it contains a mix of wildflower species that have deep rooting properties and penetrate heavy clay soils and are also drought tolerant, making them ideal for such areas. However you can combine this mix with the flowering meadow mix if you wish, and both mixes should still grow, but for this type of soil condition, Heavy Clay Soils Wildflowers would probably be the best option.
Answer by: Colm Hicks on 20 Sept 2022, 08:56
Are any of the flowers/ grasses in the wildflower mix for clay soil poisonous for dogs or children?
Question by: Lucy on 13 Oct 2020, 10:36
Hi Rebecca

The safeness and suitability of sowing wildflowers in reach of children and pets largely concerns whether consumption / ingestion of the flowers is of a huge concern. Wildflowers such as Buttercups and Foxgloves are poisonous to animals and can be to humans, and are present in all of our wildflower mixes. Each of these wildflowers have minor to moderate toxicity and can prove fatal if consumed / ingested in any amount. Therefore, we would not recommend sowing any of our wildflower seed mixes, or any others, near your children or pets if you have concerns that they would consume them.

Animals have intelligent instincts and by using their scent can work out what is and what isn’t poisonous, so there is low risk of them wanting to snack on your wildflowers. However, if your pet or livestock has a penchant for wolfing down wildflowers or any other garden flora it’s best not to put anything in front of them that could potentially harm them. Likewise, children may have the same curiosity. If you are concerned that your child may try to eat the wildflowers in your garden, then again, we would advise not sowing them.

Answer by: Roisin McCann on 13 Oct 2020, 15:35
Hi there, I'm interested in turning a large area of unused turf into a wild flower meadow, however I live next to a railway cutting which is basically a reservoir for weeds and they literarily grow everywhere and very stubbornly, no matter how careful I am. How do I stop the weeds such as thistles, docks, dandelion and nettles completely taking over the meadow after it has been established? For my front lawn even though it's really healthy and thick, I have to use a selective week killer twice or three times a year and that keeps them under control, but can you do this with wild flowers? I'm just worried the whole thing will turn to weeds and I don't have time to be pulling anything up by hand. Thank you :-)
Question by: Catriona Wood on 1 Oct 2022, 12:50
Hi Catriona, it is important to ensure that the majority have been cleared prior to sowing wildflower seeds. Wildflowers are great, as in they love low nutrient soils and are not high maintenance and are pretty impressive to look at. However, there is some maintaining in order to keep the meadow going each year. As you know weeds, grow quite quickly so it is important to have good weed control in order to allow the wildflowers to establish, if not the weeds will just choke out the wildflowers. This mix contains grasses which help create a nursery for the wildflowers allowing them some protection from the weeds, but even grass isn't immune.

First, apply a weedkiller to the area prior to sowing and remove as much as possible. You could leave for a week or 2 to see if any return and then remove these manually, this won't be difficult as the roots will be shallow at this stage. Then once established, try to remove weeds as you spot them or treat with a selective herbicide, these can be applied to an existing meadow as they will only treat selected weeds.

At the end season, once the meadow has bloomed, cut back the meadow and remove any cuttings, each year you could add little seed or help the existing flowers self seed. A full, dense meadow will create less room for the weeds. We do have few interesting blogs on the website that you might be interested in.
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 3 Oct 2022, 11:22
Could you tell me the max height of the wildflower mix for heavy clay soil please ?
Question by: Sue Wolstenholme on 7 Aug 2021, 12:08
Hi Sue, unfortunately we can not provide the exact height for each meadow mix, as some wildflowers may establish differently in certain areas and conditions. Some of the wildflowers and grasses in the mixes can grow to over a meter though.
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 10 Aug 2021, 15:08
I have just ordered this seed, it recommend sowing in september or october but it is unlikely that I will get it out before the first week in November, will this be ok? I live in North West of England. Also I was contemplating buying a low fertility soil to sow this seed into, will this be ok. Thank you
Question by: Jill Bradburn on 28 Oct 2020, 18:06
Hi Jill

There are two times in the year that we recommend sowing a meadow, one is spring and the other is autumn. Autumn is an ideal time because the seeds need to undergo the process of stratification (a freeze) to kick start their germination. If you were to sow the seed now, the wildflowers will not bloom until next spring, early in the season. However if there are grass species within the mix you can expect to see these first within weeks of sowing if the temperature is right. Ideally temperatures for germination need to be 8-10 degrees Celsius, if you have these sort of temperatures consistently for 2 weeks then the seeds should germinate. If you feel that the weather is not guaranteed or it is too cold in your part of the country then I would suggest that you delay sowing until Spring. If you decide to wait until next year and sow in the spring then your meadow will flower in the summer.
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 29 Oct 2020, 09:37
How long does the wildflower seed last unsown? I'll need to order a 1kg bag for the area I need but I will have a fair bit left over. Thanks.
Question by: Austin Heraty on 13 Aug 2021, 11:12
Hi Austin, if the seeds are kept in a sealed bag somewhere cool and dry they will last up to 12 months.
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 13 Aug 2021, 11:15
Can wildflowers be grown on gault clay?
Question by: Georgina on 15 Mar 2021, 15:18
Hi Georgina


This is something we haven't tried before and can't guarantee how it will turn out.

It is a very heavy clay based environment but if you wish to try it and as long as you can create a seedbed, we would recommend that you sow on a day when the soil is moist but not saturated.

Heavy Clay Soils Wildflowers. This is a mix of wildflower species that have deep rooting properties and penetrate heavy clay soils and are drought tolerant. This is a mix of annuals, perennials and grasses.

I am sorry that I could not be of more help on this ocassion.

Answer by: Roisin McCann on 15 Mar 2021, 15:40

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