Sandy Soils Wildflowers

  • Low maintenance mix that thrives in sandy soils
  • Contains a vibrant variety of annual and perennial wildflowers
  • Suitable for use in road construction, sand pits and on free draining sites
From £37.80 £31.50
 

How much do I need?

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Product Description

Sandy Soils get a hard time for making it difficult to grow or establish plants or grass, but we know that with the right mix – an abundant wildflower meadow can be created within even the sandiest of soils! The wildflower species in this mix were picked for their unbridled ability to root, grow and thrive in sandy soils conditions, turning your sandy soil eyesore into a wildflower haven. As the species in this mix are RHS Plants for Pollinator approved, they are also a great source of food for bees and other pollinators.

Mixture Breakdown

2.0% Wild Carrot
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

White

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Daucus carota

Description

Part of the carrot family, Wild Carrot smells like carrots but is not the kind of one you would want to eat. Its low nutrient and drought tolerant abilities make it ideal for sandy soils.

2.7% Oxeye Daisy
When does it bloom?

May – September

What colour is it?

White / Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Leucanthemum vulgare

Description

Imagine the daisy chain these would make! Oxeye Daisy is the largest member of the daisy family and its almost flat surface makes the perfect landing pad for bees and pollinators.

2.5% Black Medick
When does it bloom?

April - July

What colour is it?

Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Annual

Latin Name

Medicago lupulina

Description

Despite its name, Black Medick is actually a yellow wildflower that resembles a clover. Just like a clover, it is exceptionally good at attracting bees and pollinators and due to its 'sprawling' ability, is particularly good at thriving in clay soils!

1% Yellow Rattle
When does it bloom?

May - September

What colour is it?

Yellow

Annual or Perennial?

Annual

Latin Name

Rhinanthus minor

Description

Yellow Rattle can be used in existing meadows where meadow grasses have taken over. It helps to weaken these grasses to allow other wildflowers to flourish, and does this by locking its roots to those of the grasses, and therefore lessens their abundance.

0.4% Weld
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

Green

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Reseda luteola

Description

Weld sprouts teeny tiny cream buds and has a tendency to appear near foot paths. Although it may not have as much flora as other wildflowers, the spikes on its small flowers are an excellent source of pollen and nectar for butterflies and bees.

1.2% Birdsfoot Trefoil
When does it bloom?

May – September

What colour is it?

Yellow / Red

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Lotus corniculatus

Description

Birdsfoot Trefoil is part of the pea family and grows up to 35cm. It is well known for its yellow slipper like petals and red centre, which has given it the nickname of 'Eggs and Bacon'!

0.4% Kidney Vetch
When does it bloom?

June – September

What colour is it?

Yellow / Orange

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Anthyllis vulneraria

Description

Kidney Vetch is a bright yellow budding wildflower that sometimes gets the name Woundwort. Although this isn't the nicest nickname, it was once used for treating ailments, and of course - wounds.

0.5% Vipers Bugloss
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

Violet

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Echium vulgare

Description

The electric blue blooms of Vipers Bugloss are irresistible to bees and as its stamen’s stick out, they’re extra easy to get to. Offering a pop of colour to your meadow, you can be sure that this wildflower is a tourist attraction for bees far and wide.

2.2% Yarrow
When does it bloom?

June – November

What colour is it?

White / Occasionally pink

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Achillea millefolium

Description

Yarrow produces clusters of white small-petalled blooms. It is an aromatic perennial making it particularly attractive to bees and pollinators who are enamoured by its sweet scent.

25% Tall Fescue
When does it bloom?

This is a grass seed and typically germinates at temperatures of 8 -10 degrees

What colour is it?

Green / Beige

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Festuca arundinacea

Description

Tall Fescue is a grass that performs in most soil types

25% Crested Dogstail
When does it bloom?

This is a grass seed and typically germinates at temperatures of 8 -10 degrees

What colour is it?

Green / Beige

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Cynosurus cristatus

Description

Crested Dogstail is a grass that performs in most soil types

25% Slender Creeping Red Fescue
When does it bloom?

This is a grass seed and typically germinates at temperatures of 8 -10 degrees

What colour is it?

Green / Beige

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Festuca rubra

Description

Strong Creeping Red Fescue is a grass that performs in most soil types

1% Dark Mullein
When does it bloom?

June - September

What colour is it?

Yellow / Purple

Annual or Perennial?

Perennial

Latin Name

Verbascum nigrum

Description

Dark Mullein is a very tall wildflower that is used to growing in dry places - so is ideal for sandy soils. We love its large yellow petals and purple centre.

Usage Guide

Remove any existing grass, plants or flora from the area where you plan to sow your wildflower seed. Failure to do this will produce poor results
Further remove the top 5-10cm to reduce soil fertility
Allow the area to cultivate for several weeks, and remove any weeds that may pop in the area during this time
Do not be tempted to add top soil, compost or fertiliser to the area - wildflowers prefer low nutrient conditions
After the cultivation period ensure to remove stones or any other debris and rake the area to create a fine, friable and level seedbed
Scatter the seed at a rate of 5g per m2
Rake the seed so that it is in amongst the soil
Water the just-sown wildflower seed well
If sowing in drought conditions, water as required to keep the area moist in the first 6 weeks after sowing

Sowing Rate 5 grams per m2
When For best results sow in September

Aftercare

I’ve sown my wildflower seed in April / May (spring)

In August / September of the first year you have sown your wildflower seed, cut your wildflower sward to 7cm after flowering – you can do this by putting your mower on a high setting. In most cases remove clippings* (Note: a late spring sowing will result in late flowering). Do not be tempted fertilise or add top soil to this area – wildflowers prefer poor soil conditions, and this is how they should stay. Continue this same process, year after year. *If you have annual wildflowers in your mix and you do not wish them to return the following year, remove the clippings. If you want your wildflowers to return the following year - let them go to seed head, and manually assist their self-seeding by firming the seed heads into the soil. By doing this, your annuals will return the following year.

I’ve sown my wildflower seed in September / October (autumn)

In March / April of the first year of sowing your wildflower seed, make sure there is sufficient material to mow – your wildflowers / grasses should be at a height of 10cm. If your wildflowers are at this height, mow to 7cm no later than mid-April, as this will delay their blooming process. In August / September, after they have bloomed, cut your wildflower meadow again to 7cm, remove all clippings unless you want your annuals to return. If you wish for your annual wildflowers to make a reappearance the following spring, follow the process above by letting the seed heads drop into the soil, and give them a helping hand by firming them into the soil.

The above photo depicts the variety of species you should expect to see in your wildflower display. Please note that certain species within this mix and all our wildflower mixes may become more abundant than others, subject to the conditions that they are sown in. Taking this into consideration, your wildflower meadow will evolve and adapt year on year, changing in appearance as certain species may become more dominant than others.

Product Questions

Product Questions

Hello, we've just pulled up all the concrete in our garden and want to turn it into a wildflower/grass meadow. At the moment it's 3 or 4 inches of what looks like builder's sand. I know low fertility is good, and we're not going to add topsoil, but it's there another kind of low - fertility soil we can add, just so it's not nearly 100% sand and will be better for my son to run around on? Thanks
Question by: Sarah Miles on 28 Sept 2020, 14:23
If it is sharp sand which it more than likely is then it will be fine. However 100% sand won’t be good enough and you would need to add decent topsoil/loam and incorporate that, that should see you end up with a sandy soil, that is clean (providing the topsoil is) but has some nutrients to sustain the plants. I would then recommended our flowering meadow mix rather than the sandy soil mix, it will be better for a garden, with possibly the addition of some Meadow just for added colour.

Thanks Roisin
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 30 Sept 2020, 10:19
Hi. We have inherited an old equestrian sand school and want to turn it into a wild flower meadow. It has a hardcore base layer with about 80mm of sand on top. What preparation would you suggest we do to the sand and what seed would you recommend?
Thanks
Question by: Martin Spencer on 20 Jan 2023, 18:40
Hi Martin, thank you for your question.

Sandy Soils Wildflowers is the most suitable for this area. It is a mix of wildflowers that have the ability to root, grow and thrive in sandy soil conditions and tolerate soils that are free draining and prone to dryness. This mix contains annuals, perennials and grasses and majority of the wildflowers are perennials.

Below you will find our step by step guide on how to prep and sow a wildflower meadow but if you would like to email some photos of the area to Expert@thegrasspeople.com, I can take a look and advise.

Answer by: Roisin McCann (Admin) on 23 Jan 2023, 09:04
we live in North West Fl. so when would be the best time to sow the Wild Flowers?
Question by: gesa m. schimmer on 26 Sept 2021, 18:59
Hi, all our mixes and seeds are native to the UK. Unfortunately we can only advise on UK climate and what is best for these regions. I am sorry I could not be of more help on this occasion.
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 27 Sept 2021, 11:04
Can I ask if you do low growing meadow seeds which will thrive in sandy soil, please? By low growing, I’m thinking 30cm (12 inches) in height.
Thanks
Question by: Leslie Durrant on 13 Oct 2021, 14:17
Hi, unfortunately we can not make a recommendation for a mix based on height as the mixes contain so many different varieties of wildflower and some may flourish in areas and grow quite tall or they may stay relatively low, this is just something we can not know exactly
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 13 Oct 2021, 14:30
We have a track 220 metres long. On one side we have a verge that is approximately 1metre wide with a ditch and on the other the verge is approximately half a metre wide. It has top soil on both and there is a mixture of clay and sand. As it’s a long track I would like a grass with wild flowers with a short low maintenance grass. Please can you advise what is best for these conditions. Thank you

Question by: Alison OConnor on 19 Oct 2021, 18:48
Hi, if you would like to send some pictures through to Expert@thegrasspeople.com, we would be happy to look at the area and make few recommendations.
Answer by: Roisin McCann on 20 Oct 2021, 08:45

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